Pulp Nostalgia

We’ve entered a season of retro pulp nostalgia here at Crimeculture. Our three new series feature crime writers, reviewers, critics and publishers. If you’d like to take part, please drop us a line.

iwakeupscreaming_thumbMy Misspent Youth

A series of short reminiscences from crime writers based around a memento from their childhood – a favourite novel, photograph, poster, toy, baseball card and so on – that is connected to their writing life.  Our featured writers will be talking about the memories associated with their memento, about how they first came to be a writer and about their current projects.

Ayo Onatade talks about how her youthful fling with The Mysterious Affair at Styles propelled her towards a life of crime.

Charlie Stella on a 1960 mob movie he became enamoured with and that would serve as an epiphany much later in life.

Patti Abbott’s true confessions about her misspent adolescence.

Lynn Kostoff’s lyrical micro-memoir moves from memories of the treehouse his father built him in ’62 to his writing life in the present.

alldetective_thumbThe Best Pulp Covers

In this series, we’ll feature contributors’ favourite crime novel covers and their explanation of why it’s their favourite. If you would like to contribute a cover, please send us the name (and an image, if available) of your favourite pulp cover along with 150 words or so describing what it is you love about it.

Bill Crider talks about the cover for A Night For Screaming.

“Simple. Stark. Effective”: Kirk Lake on the covers of the 1970s Coronet paperbacks of Richard Stark novels.

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Bad Girls

Crimeculture contributors discuss their favourite bad girls, femmes fatales, female villains and noir heroines drawn from the annals of crime fiction, film, comics, graphic novels and true crime… If you are interested in contributing, send us the name (and an image, if available) of your favourite bad girl along with 300 words or so about her.

Adele Wearing tells us why ‘Bad Girls Go Everywhere’ in this witty reflection on femmes fatales

Paul D. Brazill tells us about his favourite bad lieutenant, Detective Constable Rachel Bailey of Scott & Bailey